Viewing entries in
China

Comment

Adam's Story

In this narrative, 11-year-old Adam* shares his story. After being abandoned at birth and suffering a painful loss, Adam was passed on to relatives who could not afford his care. Because of Adam's past he is considered "un-adoptable" by Chinese standards and is among thousands of orphans left out of the government's orphan count. This "un-adoptable" status means Adam and his family did not qualify for government assistance, so they sought help from a World Orphans training center in Beijing.

For the first time in his life, Adam is pursuing an education, eats three healthy meals a day and is part of a stable and loving family.

ADAM'S STORY:

Where did I come from? I don’t know. I was abandoned when I was born. A kind farmer from a nearby county adopted me and gave me his name.

My foster father treated me like his own son. When I was 5 years old, I had a fever in the night. He tried to lower my temperature down but it didn’t work. I still had high fever by 3 a.m.

My father took me and ran to a nearest clinic. He knocked on the door for a long time and begged them to treat me. I was put on infusion for three hours. He waited there without his coat on as he left home in a rush and did not have time to put on his coat. It was in the winter and was very cold. The next day he got sick too.

When I was 6 years old, a sudden car accident took his life away from me.

Afterwards, I lived with my foster father’s brother. My uncle and aunt gave me a second home. My aunt love me like a mom and made me feel the warmth of being at home. They are not rich and had to support me with extra living cost.

In November of 2009, I came to (a World Orphans home)*.

Since then I have a third home. I am happy living here and proud of being here. I can have delicious food and warm clothes. I also go to school in a shuttle bus. They provide me with everything including the school supplies.

(My housefather) and the teachers here take good care of us and they want to train us to be good citizens in the future. Even my (foster) parents didn’t think about it. Because of their sacrifice I can start the way toward success today. I promise to study hard and try my best to reach my goal.

* name and details changed to protect the identities of those involved

Comment

Comment

Chinese pastor cares for 76 orphans in Beijing

By age 7, Jacob* was an expert at scouring the streets for food. With both of his parents imprisoned and his grandparents under house arrest, Jacob lived like an orphan, abandoned and alone. But Jacob said he continued to hope in the possibility of his parents’ release from prison.

Even when he was sent to a forced labor camp, Jacob waited for the day when he would be reunited with his parents.

The couple was finally released four years later but shortly after gaining their freedom, Jacob’s father was killed and his mother suffered a mental collapse.

Feeling truly alone, Jacob saw suicide as an escape.

It was at this desperate time that he met a Christian woman who told him about Christ.

Suddenly there was a new hope, a new reason to live.

Today, Jacob is a pastor who inspires hope in Chinese orphans at a World Orphans facility in Beijing.

The facility houses 76 children who are not eligible for Chinese government assistance.  Due to strict government guidelines, these children are not adoptable because they are not considered "true orphans."

Without the Beijing Training Center, these children would be left to indifferent family members or forced to survive on their own.

In order to continue this effective ministry, we are looking for one or more church partners to provide the financial resources and encouragement this project needs.

The training center is also available for 10 orphan advocacy groups to provide funding for the facility's 10 apartments.

*name changed to protect the pastor’s identity

Comment

Comment

A True Family-Care Model for Orphaned & Abandoned Children in China

Go to video on Vimeo.

China has one of the largest orphan populations in the world. Many of these children are abandoned due to physical disabilities, because of China's one-child policy, or simply because they are girls. Although the Christian church is not able to have a physical presence, our network partner is reaching out to these precious ones with the help of local house churches.

Watch our new video to see how World Orphans is helping provide biblical family care for 76 children at the Bejing Training Center - children who are not eligible for Chinese government assistance under their strict guidelines. Without the center, these children would be left to indifferent family members or forced to survive on their own.

The Training Center is located in a former school that has been renovated to form 10 apartment-style homes, a central eating area and the training areas. The children are divided into families of eight who live with carefully selected Christian house parents devoted to providing the physical, emotional, spiritual and mental care they need.

Comment

Comment

Our China home, hope for the future

By age 7, Samuel was an expert at scouring the streets for food. With both of his parents imprisoned and his grandparents under house arrest, Samuel lived like an orphan, abandoned and alone. But Samuel said he continued to hope in the possibility of his parents’ release from prison.

Even when he was sent to a forced labor camp, Samuel waited for the day when he would be reunited with his parents.

The couple was finally released four years later but shortly after gaining their freedom, Samuel’s father was killed and his mother suffered a mental collapse.

Feeling truly alone, Samuel saw suicide as an escape.

It was at this desperate time that he met a Christian woman who told him about Christ.

Suddenly there was a new hope, a new reason to live.

Today, Samuel inspires that same hope in 76 Chinese orphans at a World Orphans facility in Shanghai. The home, called a Training Center, houses 76 children in 10 apartments where they live with house parents.

The children attend one of the best schools in the province during the week and participate in specialized martial and performing arts courses during the weekend.

Samuel is hoping to open the center to 26 additional orphans, but due to a lack of funding, the vacancies will have to wait to be filled.

The project is available for a Western church partner that will be able to take short-term teams to work with the children at the training facility and those in the outlying community.

Comment