The Language of Hope


By Tacy Layne | Writer/Editor language-of-hope-1Isn’t it remarkable how the world can change in just a few hours? One short flight from Ft. Lauderdale will take you to Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and suddenly everything has changed. Most notably, unless you’re fluent in Creole, you cannot understand anything that’s being said around you.

Within a few hours though, you’ve settled into the normalcy of not being able to understand those around you. So, when English words in a recognizable American song burst through the Haitian air in a tiny peach-walled room with rough-cut pew benches, your heart stops for a moment.

Savior, He can move the mountains, My God is mighty to save, He is mighty to save.

Forever, Author of Salvation, He rose and conquered the grave, Jesus conquered the grave.

You’re surrounded by the beautiful faces of orphaned children exclaiming the might of their Savior. But, you need to know more before you can appreciate the sacredness of these heartfelt words.

language-of-hope-2After the Haiti earthquake of 2010, a local Haitian pastor received a phone call from one of his congregation members. The individual said, "Pastor, I think you're going to want to come down to the church. You won't believe what we're seeing down here." When he arrived, the pastor was greeted by 370 orphaned children. In an effort to find homes for the children quickly, he began calling other pastors in the area to seek their assistance. In the meantime, the children slept in tents outside the church. Since that shocking and seemingly hopeless day in 2010, all 370 children are either in local homes or they're one of the children now living under the care of the pastor.

But, the story doesn’t end there. Last year, the pastor became ill. Fevered, growing increasingly thin every day and having no strength, he’d lie on the floor of the building that the orphans call “home” – his home – and he’d wait to die. The children were heartbroken for this man who had become a father-figure to them. Day and night, they would surround him, pouring out prayers and tears on his behalf. They believed the mighty Savior who sheltered them in the chaos of the earthquake could heal him.

God healed the pastor.

In a hot church in Haiti on a December afternoon, orphaned children proclaim “Mighty to Save” with confidence and joy, and a smile comes to life on their pastor’s face. When it comes to hope, it doesn’t matter what language you speak.

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