Widows, Orphans, and Home Based Care


By Jeremy Resmer | Senior Director of Projects

I’ve heard it said by leaders and members in the church, “Our church focuses on evangelism and discipleship.”  Or swap out evangelism and discipleship with other words like ministry, outreach, fellowship, worship, prayer, fasting, community, relationship, service, and teaching to name a few.

Haiti

My position at World Orphans allows me to travel to several Majority countries and meet with pastors and leaders about orphan care and the church.  As a result, I have tremendous appreciation for the gifts, passions, resourcefulness, creativity, and diversity within the church globally.  Of course, like when reading a thought-provoking book, I get excited when I hear stories of monumental faith, supernatural healing, and intervention by the Holy Spirit.  Each time I return home, like clockwork, I begin to pray for God to show up in my own life just like in Uganda, or Haiti, or Nicaragua, or like he did for my friend down the street.  In fact, God is with us always during the miracles and monotony.  And in my prayer for God to show up, I am constantly reminded of the early church.

The Early Church Teaches Us In Acts 2:42-47 we read that believers were committed to evangelism, fellowship, discipleship, worship, and ministry.  All of these characteristics defined the early church, not simply one or two.  Of course it was and still should be defined by all of these because it is a living, breathing organism made up of people from all walks of life with unique experiences and perspectives fused with diverse strengths, passions, and resources.

And yet, many times our churches are strong in one, two, or maybe even three areas.  Without a system and structure to be intentional and balance the five purposes, as Rick Warren states, your church will tend to overemphasize the purpose that best expresses the gifts and passions of its pastor.  This is all too common at churches everywhere.  It’s not limited by geography or denomination.

For me, this is where my faith collides with my livelihood.  James 1:27 can only happen when faith meets works.  To care for orphans and widows requires action.  The Word is alive and inspires, no it compels us to get up from the bench and insert ourselves into the game, to serve others and be compassionate.  I’ve often asked myself, “How is it that pure, undefiled religion goes hand-in-hand with orphans and widows?” and “Does what I do really matter?”

Without God, we are all orphans - each without a parent.  Without Jesus, we are all widows - each without a leader.  We were created to be in fellowship with God, to glorify him and be his ambassadors. And only the church, through the power of the gospel, has the ability and the mandate to connect both spiritual and physical orphans and widows to God.

What Can We Do? So how do we do it? How does the church engage in fellowship, worship, evangelism, discipleship, and ministry concurrently while caring for the spiritual and physical needs of orphans and widows?

One way is through a church-led visitation ministry that supports and strengthens fragile families, single mothers, and orphaned and abandoned children.  It is a family-based outreach that provides wholistic care for children in a home environment.  After the earthquake in Haiti and several meetings with pastors, church leaders, and caregivers, World Orphans, in conjunction with the local churches, developed Home Based Care (HBC) to address the unique needs of orphaned and vulnerable children living with extended family and neighbors.  Since then, HBC has been contextualized and embraced by churches in Kenya, Ethiopia, and Guatemala.

Here’s how it works:

  • The pastor casts the vision and selects a committee of 4-5 volunteer members
  • The committee receives training and creates a strategy and plan to minister to the most vulnerable families in the community
  • The committee meets with the families, learns more about them and their current situation; additional research is conducted, and families are invited to participate in the program
  • The Home Based Care committee visits each family twice per month, builds relationships and provides ongoing encouragement, support, and prayer

Included in the program is access to food, education, counseling, and home visitation by HBC committee members and discipleship by the local church.

The feedback by the church, the children, and the community has been nothing short of amazing!

“Home Based Care helps marginalized people find their identity.” – Ethiopia

“I didn’t know why the church was helping us.  Surely, they must have made a mistake.  We didn’t deserve to be helped.  We didn’t even attend church.  But I am so thankful and I give praise to God because he has saved me and my family and for the first time, we have hope for a better future.” – Haiti

Home Based Care Works! Here are some tangible ways HBC combines evangelism, fellowship, discipleship, worship, and ministry.

  • Family-based care preserves and stabilizes existing families.
  • Children and families are selected based on the greatest need.  80% of beneficiaries are outside the church (Muslim, Orthodox and unbelievers) and 20% are from inside the church.  We are reaching children and caregivers with the gospel.
  • Visits are based on relationship and partnership with struggling families.
  • Home visits are done by volunteers from the local church and utilize resources inside the community.  The program can be cost-effective and scalable.
  • Treats orphaned children, widows, and other marginalized people with dignity and respect.
  • Strengthens the capacity of existing immediate and extended families.  Transformation of the families is observable and often includes a renewed identity in Christ.
  • Elevates the role of the local church and empowers believers.
  • Provides encouragement, sharing of the gospel and prayer for one another.
  • Connects the family to the local church to be part of community events, children’s activities, worship, Sunday school, and ongoing discipleship.
  • Builds confidence and inspires more people in the church to get involved and provide leadership in the community.
  • Establishes a network of churches and church plants that share information, resources, and best practices.

Ethiopia

In all my travels, I have yet to learn of another ministry within the church that is more effective at simultaneously building relationships, sharing the gospel, and inspiring people to get involved in meeting the needs of the community.  I’m totally convinced Home Based Care plays an important role in the livelihood and growth of our church partners.

“And the Lord added to their number daily those who were being saved.”  May it be so.

After reading more about home based care, what thoughts do you have?

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